CRAIG VENTER WATCH ME UNVEILS SYNTHETIC LIFE

July 25, 2019 posted by

And then early one morning, at 6 a. Dr Venter’s team developed a new code based on the four letters of the genetic code, G, T, C and A, that allowed them to draw on the whole alphabet, numbers and punctuation marks to write the watermarks. You have JavaScript disabled. And we can walk through the reasons for that, but basically the small cell took on the order of one to two months to get results from, whereas the larger, faster-growing cell takes only two days. And we knew, once that worked, that we actually had a chance if we could make the synthetic chromosomes to do the same with those. But we’ll talk more about the watermarks in a minute.

So the team actually developed a new code within the code within the code. So last fall when we published the results of that work in Science, we all became overconfident and were sure we were only a few weeks away from being able to now boot up a chromosome out of yeast. There’s parts of the genome where it cannot tolerate even a single error, and then there’s parts of the genome where we can put in large blocks of DNA, as we did with the watermarks, and it can tolerate all kinds of errors. Could you explain, in layman’s terms, how significant a breakthrough this is please? We have, at the Institute, ongoing funding now from NIH in a program with Novartis to try and use these new synthetic DNA tools to perhaps make the flu vaccine that you might get next year. And the last one is a Richard Feynman quote: Because of the problems with Mycoplasma genitalium and its slow growth about a year and a half ago, we decided to synthesize the much larger chromosome, the mycoides chromosome, knowing that we had the biology worked out on that for transplantation. And we added three quotations, because with the first genome we were criticized for not trying to say something more profound than just signing the work.

Inwe started a new institute, the Institute for Biological Energy Alternatives, where we set out two goals: And once we had done that, now we can take naked DNA out of yeast and transplant it.

Craig Venter: Watch me unveil “synthetic life” – ISBELight

In the vaccine area, Synthetic Genomics and the Institute are forming a new vaccine company because we think these tools can affect vaccines to diseases that haven’t been possible to date, things where the viruses rapidly evolve, such with rhinovirus. However critics, unveil some religious groups, condemned the work, with one organisation warning that artificial organisms could escape into the wild and cause environmental havoc or be turned into biological weapons.

That little issue took the team two years to solve. Dr Venter’s team developed a new code based on the four letters of the genetic code, G, T, C and A, that allowed them to draw on the whole alphabet, numbers and punctuation marks to write the watermarks. Even with this announcement, as we did in — that work was funded by the Department of Energy, so ne work was reviewed at the level of the White House, trying to decide whether to classify the work or ventet it. And so both sides were progressing, but part of the synthesis had to be accomplished or was able to be accomplished using yeast, putting the fragments in yeast and yeast would assemble these for us.

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And then early one morning, at 6 a. So early on, we developed the notion of putting in watermarks in the DNA to absolutely make clear that the DNA was synthetic.

Craig Venter creates synthetic life form | Science | The Guardian

So when you see how long it took to get an H1N1 vaccine out, we think we can shorten that process quite substantially. So last fall when we published the results of that work in Science, we all became overconfident and were sure we were only a few weeks away from being able to now boot up a chromosome out of yeast.

The research is reported online today in the journal Science. Craig Venterthe pioneering US geneticist behind the experiment, said the achievement heralds the dawn of a new era in which new life is made to benefit humanity, starting with bacteria that churn out biofuels, soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and even manufacture vaccines.

So in the remaining information, in the watermarks, contain the names of, I think it’s 46 different authors and key contributors to getting the project to this stage.

But it turned out it wasn’t going to be as simple in the end, and it set us vehter three months because we had one error out of over a million base pairs in that sequence. So, there are four major watermarks all over 1, base pairs of genetic code. We decided early on that we had to take a synthetic route, even though nobody had been there before, to see if we could synthesize a bacterial chromosome so we could actually vary the gene content to understand the essential genes for life.

And we added three quotations, because with the first genome we were criticized for not trying to say something more profound than just signing the work. Early on, when you’re working in a new synnthetic of science, you have to think about all the pitfalls and things that could venteer you to believe that you had done something when you hadn’t, and, even worse, leading others to believe it. Others said Venter was playing God. It turned out the cell that we were trying to transplant into had mf nuclease, an enzyme that chews up DNA on its surface, and was happy to eat the synthetic DNA that we gave it and never got transplantations.

Craig Venter: Watch me unveil “synthetic life”

Because of the problems with Mycoplasma genitalium and its slow growth about a year and a half ago, we decided to synthesize the much larger chromosome, the mycoides chromosome, knowing that we had the biology worked out on that for transplantation.

And as soon as we had these two sequences we thought, if this is supposed to be the smallest genome of a self-replicating species, could there be even a smaller genome? The first is, “To live, to err, to fall, to triumph and to recreate life out of life. You can only do them syntjetic at a time. And the first chromosome we built in — the ,base pair one — we simply assigned the names of the authors of the chromosome into the genetic code, but it was using just amino acid single letter translations, which leaves out certain letters of the alphabet.

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So what we found is if we took the chromosome out of yeast and methylated it, we could then transplant it. That started our year quest to get here. So in addition to doing the transplant, we had to find out how to get a bacterial chromosome out of the eukaryotic yeast into a form wach we could transplant it into a recipient cell. So there’s only so many cycles we could go through in a year at six weeks per cycle.

When we started this out, we thought the synthesis would be the biggest problem, which is why we chose the smallest genome. Yes, in the back. So it’s clearly distinguishable from any other species, having 46 names in it, its own web address. There’s parts of the genome where it cannot tolerate even a single error, and then there’s parts of the genome where we can put in large blocks of DNA, as we did with the watermarks, and it can tolerate all kinds of errors.

This is “a defining moment in the history of biology and biotechnology”, Mark Bedaua philosopher at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, told Science. Dr Venter became a controversial figure in the s when he pitted his former company, Celera Genomicsagainst the publicly funded effort to sequence the human genome, the Human Genome Project.

Craig Venter creates synthetic life form

And they came down on the side of open publication, which is the right approach — we’ve briefed the White House, we’ve briefed members of Congress, we’ve tried to take and push the policy issues in parallel with the scientific advances. Could you explain, in layman’s terms, how significant a breakthrough this is please? So this was a debugging, problem-solving scenario from the beginning because there was no recipe of how to get there. Also, at Synthetic Genomics, we’ve been working on major environmental issues.

I think philosophically, that was one of the most important papers that we’ve ever done because it showed how dynamic life was. From this, new microorganisms could be made by bolting on additional genes to produce useful chemicals, break down pollutants, or produce proteins for use in vaccines.

But before we did the first experiments, we actually asked Art Caplan’s team at the University of Pennsylvania to undertake a review of what the risks, the challenges, the ethics around creating new species in the laboratory were because it hadn’t been done before.

They spent about two years reviewing that independently and published their results in Science in